Candlelight Concert Series for Epilepsy Awareness

The Candlelight Concert Series for Epilepsy Awareness is a concert series in Pennington, NJ designed to raise awareness about epilepsy. It's grown out of a very popular house concert series and is now held at Trinity United Methodist at 1985 Pennington Rd, Ewing NJ. When you purchase your ticket using Paypal below, you will be added to the list; no physical tickets are printed or sent. You can bring you receipt to be safe. All shows are general admission. For more on this series, check out this article from The Times of Trenton here. The Epilepsy Foundation of New Jersey will be on-hand for most of these events to provide information and accept donations.

Saturday May 30th 2015
Live at Trinity
CANCELLED
ALL STAR TRIBUTE TO PAUL MCCARTNEY
featuring
Dana Fuchs,
Mark Hudson,
Wesley Stace
(John Wesley Harding),
Pat DiNizio
(The Smithereens),
Corey Glover
(Living Colour)
Val Emmich
Ginger Coyle,
Doug Wimbish
(Living Colour)
Paul Pesco
(Hall & Oates)
7:00PM Doors
8:00PM Show
$40 Advance/$50 Day-Of Show

Trinity UMC
1985 Pennington Road
Ewing, NJ 08618

[Map]

Featuring:

Dana Fuchs

Website

Mark Hudson

Website

Wesley Stace

Website

Pat DiNizio of The Smithereens

Website

Corey Glover of Living Colour

Website

Val Emmich

Website

Doug Wimbish of Living Colour

Website

Ginger Coyle

Website

Paul Pesco
(Hall & Oates, Madonna)

Website

Grant C Weston

Website

David Dzubinski

Website
    About Paul McCartney
Paul McCartney was the first of the Beatles to work on an extracurricular recording project (the soundtrack to the 1966 film The Family Way) and also the first to release a bonafide solo album of songs (McCartney, which appeared as the Beatles were dissolving in 1970). McCartney has been the most prolific ex-Beatle and has also enjoyed the greatest measure of commercial success.

Between his work with the Beatles and as a solo artist and leader of Wings, McCartney has written or co-written more than 50 Top 10 singles. With and without Wings, McCartney has been extremely prolific, averaging an album a year since the appearance of McCartney. Moreover, he’s been eclectic as well, not only recording pop and rock but also dabbling in various classical forms and ambient dance music. In the post-Beatles era, McCartney has cracked the Top 40 35 times. When combined with the Beatles’ 49 Top 40 U.S. singles, it is a matter of statistical fact that Paul McCartney is the most successful pop-music composer ever and the second greatest hitmaker, behind Elvis Presley. Without question he is one of the most important musicians of the 20th century.

Beyond the numerical achievements, McCartney’s career is noteworthy for the purposeful way in which he demystified himself as a rock star in the wake of the Beatles. During the Seventies – a decade of ego-tripping superstars, flamboyant glam-rockers and defiant punk-rockers – McCartney modestly presented himself to the world as a family man who happened to be a working musician. His songs often celebrated the mundane pleasures of everyday life. As a songwriter who delights in the quotidian, as opposed to edgier rock and rollers steeped in mystique and risk-taking, McCartney has rarely been a favorite of rock critics. However, his body of work – some of it admittedly lightweight, much of it unjustly dismissed – has given boundless pleasure to the music loving public. Having been the primary melodist within the Beatles, it is not surprising that McCartney’s knack for an ear-catching pop tune remained very much in evidence.

McCartney’s low-key solo debut belied the turmoil that attended the simultaneous breakup of the Beatles. Recorded on a four-track machine, this collection of simple songs and fragments found him playing keyboards, guitar, bass and drums. A one-man show that added up to an evocation of (in his own words) “home, family, love,” McCartney anticipated the singer-songwriter movement that would fill the early-Seventies void after the chaos and clamor of the Sixties. McCartney appeared in April 1970, two weeks before Let It Be, the Beatles’ last studio release. A year later came Ram, credited to Paul and Linda McCartney. (The couple were married in March 1969; it was the second marriage for Linda.) Ram became a favorite with FM rock deejays and even yielded a Number One single, the whimsical, ambitious “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey.”

For the rest of the decade, save for the odd solo single, McCartney devoted his creative energies to Wings. Under the banner of Wings, McCartney worked with Linda (who played keyboards and sang) and a fairly stable lineup of musicians. Technically, Wings were an entity longer than the Beatles, though there occurred several personnel changes between their formation in 1971 and disbanding 10 years later. McCartney clearly intended Wings to be perceived as a band, and he willingly submerged his identity within the group framework, especially on Wings’ much-maligned 1971 debut, Wild Life. Their best recording – it was, in fact, attributed to Paul McCartney and Wings – was Band On the Run (1973). Recorded in Africa by the McCartneys and singer/guitarist Denny Laine (formerly of the Moody Blues), it struck many as McCartney’s attempt to deflect criticism that his post-Beatles’ work lacked substance. The album and its three Top 10 hits ("Jet," “Band on the Run” and “Helen Wheels") were catchy, energetic and fun, much like the best of the Beatles.

With the addition of guitarist Jimmy McCulloch and drummer Joe English, Wings expanded to a five-piece band for Venus and Mars. Commercially, McCartney had his finger on the pulse of the Seventies. Five consecutive Wings albums – Red Rose Speedway, Band on the Run, Venus and Mars, Wings at the Speed of Sound and Wings Over America (a triple live album) – topped the album charts. At the height of punk rock in 1977, McCartney must be considered one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century. Wings’ sentimental tribute to hearth and home, “Mull of Kintyre,” became the best-selling single in British history. So popular were Wings that in 1978, the group could fill a 13-track best-of, Wings Greatest, with nothing but hits. In 1979, Wings switched labels, from Capitol to Columbia, and released their last album, Back to the Egg. The group officially disbanded in April 1981.

McCartney resumed his solo career with 1980’s McCartney II. He followed it with Tug of War (1982), which reunited him with Beatles producer George Martin and was regarded as his strongest outing since Band On the Run. McCartney duetted with Stevie Wonder on Tug of War‘s “Ebony and Ivory” and sang with Michael Jackson on “The Girl Is Mine,” which appeared on the latter’s Thriller. Another duet with Jackson, “Say Say Say,” turned up on McCartney’s Pipes of Peace (1983). Give My Regards to Broad Street, a feature film and accompanying soundtrack, released in 1984, included his reworkings of several Beatles songs.

The McCartney catalog has swelled since the mid-Eighties as he’s tackled an eclectic assortment of projects. These include a solid run of solo albums (Press to Play, Flowers in the Dirt, Off the Ground, Driving Rain, Memory Almost Full), live albums from world tours (Tripping the Live Fantastic, Paul Is Live, Back in the U.S. and Good Evening New York), an acoustic session for MTV (Unplugged: The Official Bootleg), an album of vintage rock and roll covers (Choba B CCCP, initially released only in the Soviet Union), and a pair of electronic “rave” albums issued under the alias “The Fireman.” McCartney also explored classical forms with his Liverpool Oratorio (1991), written with conductor Carl Davis, and the orchestral piece Standing Stone (1997), composed in celebration of the 100th anniversary of EMI, his record label. Also in 1997 came Flaming Pie, a modest masterpiece that nodded to the past while reaffirming his skills as a pop craftsman. McCartney claimed to have been inspired by his involvement in the Beatles’ Anthology, the 1995 TV miniseries and three-volume retrospective of the Fab Four’s recorded work: “The Anthology was very good for me because it reminded me of the Beatles’ standards and the standards that we reached with the songs,” he said.

McCartney has scored more than 60 gold records, and he has sold more than 100 million CDs and 100 million singles. Despite his age, it appears that Paul McCartney will be a force to be reckoned with for many years to come.

About Dana Fuchs
Dana Fuchs is a phenomenon, a singer whose mesmerizing voice and presence, has led critics to compare her to Rock legends from Janis to Jagger. Fittingly, she appeared in the off-Broadway production “Love, Janis.” The multi-talented singer songwriter stars in one of the most talked-about cult films, “Across The Universe,” where she has a major presence both in the film, and on the soundtrack. Perhaps Stereophile Magazine said it best, “Imagine a sultry, more emotive Janis Joplin, backed by a higher energy version of the late 60s Rolling Stones… Rock n’ Roll doesn’t get any better.” Dana is currently on a world tour in support of her highly acclaimed new LIVE CD/DVD "Songs From The Road," released November 11th 2014 on Ruf Records.

About Mark Hudson
Mark Hudson is a record producer, musician and songwriter based in both Los Angeles and New York City. After first rising to prominence as a performer, songwriter and TV personality in the 1970s as a member of The Hudson Brothers trio, Hudson achieved independent success as record producer and songwriter – working with a broad variety of artists including Cher, Ringo Starr, Aerosmith, Scorpions, Ozzy Osbourne, Hanson, Harry Nilsson, and the Baha Men.

Mark first came on the scene in a band with his brothers, the Hudson Brothers. The Hudson Brothers had two top-20 hits, "So You Are A Star" and "Rendezvous" produced by Bernie Taupin for Elton John's Rocket Records.

For ten years starting in 1998, Hudson was the primary driving force as producer and composer behind Ringo Starr's continued career as a recording artist. In that endeavor, Hudson produced or co-produced nine albums for Starr. There were five critically acclaimed studio albums: Vertical Man, I Wanna Be Santa Claus, Ringo Rama, Choose Love and Liverpool 8. Three live albums and a compilation followed.

Mark was the vocal director and backup vocalist for artists such as David Cassidy, Wayne Newton, Cher, Alice Cooper, Jon Bon Jovi, Aaron Neville, Harry Nilsson, Hanson, Leif Garrett and more.

He has written with and produced multi-platinum artists including Aerosmith (the Grammy award-winning Aerosmith hit "Livin' on the Edge"), Burt Bacharach, Carole King, Ringo Starr, Ozzy Osbourne, Celine Dion, Bon Jovi, Hanson, the Baja Men, Alice Cooper, Boy Zone, and Leann Rimes.

About Wesley Stace (John Wesley Harding)
Formerly known by his stage name John Wesley Harding, under which he has performed and recorded for the past 25 years, Stace chose to step out from behind his well-established pseudonym for Self-Titled in honor of the increasingly personal nature of his new material. “Novels seem to take care of the intellectual business for me these days, and my songs have become a lot more intimate and autobiographical, requiring a different musical treatment entirely. It seemed ridiculous to sing them under any name but my own,” notes Stace, adding, “It’s time to bring everything under one roof.”

In addition to his storied recording career, Stace is also the author of three novels (including the international bestseller Misfortune), teaches a course called “How to Write a Song” at Princeton University with poet Paul Muldoon and is artist-in-residence at Fairleigh Dickinson University, where he has also taught creative writing. He and his work have recently been the subject of a course at Central Connecticut State University titled “The Allusive John Wesley Harding.” Stace’s contributions to The New York Times’ Measure For Measure blog can be seen at http://nyti.ms/11zz0UY. His most recent novel, Charles Jessold, Considered as a Murderer, was published to rave reviews from The New Yorker, The New York Times and the Huffington Post, among many others. The Los Angeles Times hailed the book as “carefully plotted and brilliantly executed,” while The Wall Street Journal called it “dazzling.” His fourth novel, Wonderkid, is due in March, 2014 from Overlook Press.

Since his critically acclaimed 1988 debut It Happened One Night John Wesley Harding has recorded 19 records for both major (Sire, Hollywood) and independent (Mammoth, Rhino, Appleseed, Yep Roc) labels alike.

About Pat DiNizio of The Smithereens
Pat DiNizio is the founder, principal songwriter, guitarist, and vocalist for the platinum recording artists The Smithereens.

As a youngster, he was inspired by the pop music emanating from his transistor radio in the ‘60s and the hit tunes being written by his musical idols Buddy Holly, The Beatles, and The Beau Brummels among others. He soon began crafting his own 3 minute and 3 chord hook-laden masterpieces. Perseverance paid off for Pat’s band, The Smithereens, with their chart-topping hits appearing on the radio in rapid succession like “Behind the Wall of Sleep”, “Only a Memory” and “A Girl Like You”.

The Smithereens racked up gold and platinum records, and they performed on top-rated television programs such as The Tonight Show, MTV Unplugged and Saturday Night Live as well as on stages all over the world. After 32 years together as a band, The Smithereens continue to tour and record. Their latest album, Smithereens 2011, spawned the hit radio singles “Sorry” and “One Look at You”.

Pat also performs his “Confessions of a Rock Star” venues around the country. “Confessions of a Rock Star” presents the next step in the evolution of The Smithereens’ Pat DiNizio. Part rock raconteur and part power pop pioneer, he continues to expand the boundaries of rock and roll concerts. Pat’s show has grown from its original “one man, one car, one guitar” concept into a compelling example of multimedia performance art.

About Corey Glover of Living Colour
You know Corey Glover's powerful voice. Corey is the lead singer and one fourth of the pioneering, Grammy winning, platinum selling rock band Living Colour. Living Colour earned numerous industry awards including back-to-back Grammys for Best Hard Rock Performance of 1989 ('Cult of Personality') and 1990 (Time's Up) and emerged as one of the most influential rock acts of all time: regularly selling out arenas and selling millions of albums.

But that is only a portion of his musical journey to date. In 1998, Corey released his debut solo record, Hymns, to much critical acclaim. He's been featured on records around the world as a premier vocalist, acted in motion pictures including the 1986 Best Picture Platoon, performed theatrically onstage in such shows as Jesus Christ Superstar and tours extensively with funk-rock legends, Galactic.

About Val Emmich
Val Emmich showed his interest in music since he was still a kid. However, he quickly quit his music lessons because he couldn't stand the patience needed. Things changed when he was in the sophomore year of high school and diagnosed with Lyme Disease which made him unable to play on the school soccer team. Having much time on his hand, he then took the acoustic guitar his parents bought for him and started to strum some riffs. At that point, beside learning how to strum a guitar, he also learned how to be more patient and he was glad for that.

During his years in Rutgers University, Emmich joined several bands, such as Awake Asleep and Ben Trovato. After graduating from the university in 2001, he threw himself deeper into the music industry. Writing his own songs, he worked on an independent solo mini album called "The Fifteen Minute". Full of passion, he followed the EP with another independent record, "Slow Down Kid", produced by Wayne Dorrell. Even though still unsigned by major label, he kept moving forward. He filmed a music video for his single "Privacy Attracts a Crowd". Surprisingly, the music video attracted the crowd as it appeared on MTV's "Total Request Live", making him the first unsigned artist to appear on the show.

Considered as a multi-talented musician, he was then signed by Epic Records' label, Red Ink, and recorded a new version of his "Slow Down Kid" with four additional new songs. In 2005, he moved temporarily to Woodstock, New York and started cooking up new materials for his next album. The Woodstock sessions were compiled as an independent studio album with "Sunlight Searchparty" as its title. One of the songs on the album titled "The Only One Lonely" won the best music video category at 2007 Independent Music Awards.

After "Searchparty" was released, Emmich made a surprising decision by leaving Epic Records due to artistic differences and worked out his own way. While being once again unsigned, he released an indie studio album "Songs, Volume 1: Woodstock" which took its materials from the 2005 Woodstock's sessions. After finding a new home in Bluhammock Music in 2008, he felt the urge to return to the music scene and decided to go to his drummer's house and recorded the new materials for his next album there.

Finally, after all the hard work, Emmich managed to take his record to the next level. On September 23, his album entitled "Little Daggers" was released. Listing 10 new tracks on it, the effort was aimed to draw "listeners close with great pop melodies and playful arrangements while a penetrating lyrical story unfolds underneath." In the album's recording process, he opted to produce and engineer the record himself and play a majority of the instruments. Also joining him was longtime drummer Eric Micali while a list of guest musicians contributing on the album included Blake Sennett of Rilo Kiley.

In addition to lingering in the studio to make new music, Emmich traveled around the globe with Gavin Degraw, Better Than Ezra, Dashboard Confessional, Butch Walker, and others. Besides, he also tried his hands at acting career and played on ABC's "Ugly Betty" and "Cashmere Mafia", as well as made a guest appearance on NBC's "30 Rock". On top of that, he wrote his first novel and will appear on an independent movie titled "Fighting Fish".

About Ginger Coyle
People have always loved Ginger Coyle's music. She's gotten radio airplay effortlessly, since her first original demo at age 14. She's been signed to two major labels, won national talent competitions and dominated industry showcases. A music biz veteran still in her mid-20s, she is at long last making the kind of music she wants to make. Conscious lyrics brimming with radio-friendly hooks and universal themes, Homeward Bound is her first collection of original songs. Ginger Coyle sings beautifully, and maybe that's the problem. She belongs to a lineage that stretches from Carole King through Fiona Apple, vocalists who borrow confidently from a soul music vocabulary while working mainstream pop territory. And Ginger is a gorgeous, post-millennial mashup of styles, combining the glamor of a 1940s movie star with a dash of vintage eclecticism and a passel of tattoos. She has all the raw material for a factory cranking out pop-music confections — except that she simply doesn't want to be that vessel.

About Doug Wimbish of Living Colour
Doug Wimbish of Living Colour will be serving as musical director for the evening. Doug is a legendary musician and bass player - having been with Living Colour for over 20 years. Not only that, Doug is famous as the guy laying down the grooves to some of raps biggest and earliest hits including White Lines and The Message. Doug has also played with the likes of The Rolling Stones (Bridges To Babylon), Mick Jagger (Primitive Cool, Wandering Spirit), Madonna (Erotica), Annie Lennox (Diva, Medusa), Joe Satriani (The Extremist, Time Machine), Jeff Beck (Flash), Seal (Seal), and Billy Idol to name but a few.

About Paul Pesco
Paul Pesco is a legendary guitarist, producer and composer. Paul has served as musical director and lead guitarist for Hall & Oates, and also for Daryl Hall's Live From Daryl's House TV program. He's also played guitar on tour or record with Madonna, Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey, Cyndi Lauper, Steve Winwood, Mary J Blige, Celine Dion, Al Green, Donna Summer, Eddie Murphy, Atlantic Starr, Jennifer Lopez, Alicia Keys, Kitaro, C&C Music Factory and dozens more! Such a thrill to have this amazing talent joining us for a great night of music to raise epilepsy awareness!

About Grant C Weston
Philadelphia's own Grant Calvin Weston became interested in drums at the age of 6, when he discovered his talent for rhythm as he beat on every car on the block. He lived in North Philadelphia where he saw musicians like Stevie Wonder, The Jackson Five and James Brown at the Uptown Theatre. Seeing his attention focused on the drummers, his Father bought him a small set. In high school Calvin learned to read music and played second snare in the drum ensemble. He co-founded the group Bad Influence which played in cabarets and clubs around Philadelphia. At age 17, Calvin joined Ornette Coleman’s Prime Time Band, with bass player Jamalaadean Tacuma, a close friend from philly and Charlee Ellerbe, which toured extensively in North America and Europe. After recording four albums with Prime Time, Calvin went on to play and record with guitarist James "Blood" Ulmer, until he joined John Luries Lounge Lizards in 1990. During the late 90s Calvin recorded and toured with Billy Martin of Medeski Martin and Wood, Tricky, Eyvind Kang, Derek Baily, Mark Ribot, and James Carter. He also played on several movie soundtracks including "Get Shorty".

About David Dzubinski
While a young piano student at Philadelphia's well-known Settlement Music School, David Dzubinski was chosen to perform for the composer Vincent Persichetti. Persichetti called David's performance "spirited and warm" and that description still has resonance today. After attending Temple University for jazz composition and arranging, David pursued advanced studies privately with internationally known and vastly divergent jazz pianists Joanne Brackeen, Dave Burrell and Edsel Gomez. David has performed for/with interactive dance and movement, he has directed group improvisations employing the use of crowd movements and interactions in public spaces, and he has used video and paintings as fodder for writing ensemble pieces and improvisational frame works. As well David has composed and performed music for radio shows, the theatre, and fashion shows. Some of David’s accomplishments include a jazz CD (‘Recyclical’), a Jazz Suite ('Strange Loop') with improvised interactive video commissioned by Philadelphia University, a Music Suite ('Paint') for live painting performance with the fine art painter Nathan Distefano that was commisioned by and performed for Doylestown Health and Wellness Center, performances on three of jazz vocalist/composer Kayle Brecher's CDs ('Spy Music', 'Urban Objects' and 'Apirals and Lines), a score for the Society Hill Playhouse production of Sam Sheppard's 'Suicide in Bb', and one of Dzubinski's compositions has been published by Freddie Hubbard's Hubtones.

Stay tuned for more All-Stars to be added!!!
   
Paul McCartney's Website


Paul McCartney - Maybe I'm Amazed


Paul McCartney - Hey Jude


Paul McCartney & Wings - Jet


Paul McCartney - Band On The Run


Paul McCartney - Yesterday


The Beatles - Let It Be


Paul McCartney - Live And Let Die





Saturday August 15th 2015
Live at Trinity
ALL STAR TRIBUTE TO JONI MITCHELL
featuring
Mary Fahl,
Dan Reed,
Adrien Reju,
Doug Wimbish
(Living Colour)
Paul Pesco
(Hall & Oates)
and MANY MORE
TO BE ANNOUNCED!
7:00PM Doors
8:00PM Show
$40 Advance/$50 Day-Of Show

Trinity UMC
1985 Pennington Road
Ewing, NJ 08618

[Map]


Featuring:

Mary Fahl

Website

Dan Reed

Website

Adrien Reju

Website

Doug Wimbish of Living Colour

Website

Paul Pesco
(Hall & Oates, Madonna)

Website

Grant C Weston

Website

David Dzubinski

Website
    About Joni Mitchell
A consummate artist, Joni Mitchell is an accomplished musician, songwriter, poet and painter. Hailing from Canada, where she performed as a folksinger as far back as 1962, she found her niche on the same Southern California singer/songwriter scene of the late Sixties and early Seventies that germinated such kindred spirits as Jackson Browne, Warren Zevon and Crosby, Stills & Nash. Mitchell’s artistry goes well beyond folk singing to incorporate elements of jazz and classical music. In her own words: “I looked like a folksinger, even though the moment I began to write, my music was not folk music. It was something else that had elements of romantic classicism to it.” Impossible to categorize, Mitchell has doggedly pursued avenues of self-expression, heedless of commercial outcomes. Nonetheless, she managed to connect with a mass audience in the mid-Seventies when a series of albums – Court and Spark (1974, Number Two), Miles of Aisles (1974, Number Two), The Hissing of Summer Lawns (1975, Number Four) and Hejira (1976, Number 13) – established her as one of that decade’s pre-eminent artists.

Mitchell was born Roberta Joan Anderson in a remote northwest Canadian town called Fort MacLeod. An only child, she was raised in the city of Saskatoon. When she was nine years old, she was struck with polio. Doctors feared that she would never walk again, but she did recover. She took up painting and music at an early age, teaching herself how to play guitar by reading a Pete Seeger instruction book. After high school, she went to the Alberta College of Art in Calgary, where she began playing folk music. She wrote her first song, “Day by Day,” in 1964 while she was en route to a folk festival in Toronto. She moved to Toronto a year later, where she got caught up in the city’s flourishing club scene. In 1965, she married folksinger Chuck Mitchell. The following year, they moved to Detroit. They wound up getting divorced shortly after that move, but she kept his last name.

Mitchell began building a big reputation on the Detroit folk scene, and her songs were discovered, performed and recorded by such established folk musicians as Tom Rush, Ian and Sylvia, Judy Collins (whose version of “Both Sides Now” went to Number Eight in 1968), Dave Van Ronk and Buffy Saint-Marie. British folk-rockers Fairport Convention cut some of her earliest material, as well.

Mitchell was signed to Reprise Records in 1967, and her first album, Joni Mitchell, appeared a year later. It was followed by Clouds, which included Mitchell’s versions of “Both Sides Now” and “Chelsea Morning.” In 1970, she released Ladies of the Canyon. That album went platinum and included “Big Yellow Taxi,” an anti-"progress" ditty that stands as one of Mitchell’s signature tunes. Her fourth album, 1971’s Blue, was a stunning a suite of songs about romantic disillusionment that stands as a classic in the confessional singer/songwriter mode. It included the songs “Carey,” “My Old Man” and “The Last Time I Saw Richard,” and it featured guest appearances by James Taylor and other artists. Her next album, For the Roses, came out in 1972. It reached Number 11 and included the song “You Turn Me On (I’m a Radio).”

Mitchell’s popular breakthrough came with her next album, Court and Spark, a sprightly and intelligent jazz-pop album made with musical support from the jazz-fusion ensemble Tom Scott and the L.A. Express. The album made it to Number Two and included the hit single “Help Me,” which reached Number Seven. Court and Spark was followed by Miles of Aisles, a live album that also featured Scott and his band. It also reached Number Two.

Both experimental and accessible, Mitchell’s mid-Seventies output won her a large following. The Hissing of Summer Lawns made it to Number Four, while Hejira, which appeared in 1976, is regarded as Mitchell’s masterpiece. The title is an Arabic word meaning “flight from the dream,” and the album was a uniquely textured and exploratory song cycle that traced one woman’s mystical “hejira” through this world. Jazz bassist Jaco Pastorius played on the album. He also appeared on Mitchell’s next album, Don Juan’s Reckless Daughter, as did Wayne Shorter, Chaka Khan, John Guerin and Airto.

In 1978, Mitchell was contacted by jazz bassist and composer Charles Mingus, who was dying of Lou Gehrig’s disease. The two began collaborating on a project, with Mitchell writing lyrics to accompany his melodies. Unfortunately, Mingus died before the project was completed, but Mitchell finished the album – reverently titled Mingus – and it was released in 1979, reaching Number 17, a significant accomplishment for a jazz album.

From the beginning, Mitchell played guitar in different tunings to compensate for the fact her left hand had been left weakened by her childhood bout with polio. As a result, her chord shapes, combined with the meandering meters of her more fanciful compositions, tend to resemble jazz more than standard folk or rock. Her associations with the likes of Pastorius, Scott, Shorter, Mingus and Herbie Hancock have resulted in some of her most ambitious work.

Mitchell continued to record allusive, jazz-tinged material, studded with personal revelations and socio-political commentary, throughout the Eighties and Nineties. In 1982, she released Wild Things Run Fast, which included a cover of Elvis Presley’s “(You’re So Square) Baby I Don’t Care.” Dog Eat Dog, which came out in 1985, was more politically oriented, including songs about TV evangelists and the Ethiopian famine. The album was produced by Thomas Dolby. And 1988’s Chalk Mark in a Rain Storm included appearances by Peter Gabriel, Tom Petty and Willie Nelson.

Mitchell kicked off the new millennium with Both Sides Now, an orchestrated album of torch songs by other songwriters and herself. In a sense, it brought her career full circle, since the title song was one of the very first she wrote while still a fledgling musician back in the mid-Sixties. In 2002, she released Travelogue, which featured orchestral versions of some of her earlier songs. At the time, Mitchell said that would be her final album. But then, in 2007, she issued Shine, a new studio album that she said was inspired by the war in Iraq.

Over the past decade, Mitchell has stopped touring, making only rare concert appearances. She is currently spending more time on her painting. Mitchell’s artwork adorns some of her album covers, such as the Van Gogh-inspired self-portrait on 1994’s Turbulent Indigo.

Mitchell has won eight Grammy awards during her career, and in 2002, she received a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. In 1981, she was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame.

About Mary Fahl
Singer-songwriter Mary Fahl first achieved fame as lead singer and co-founder of the mid-1990s folk-rock/adult alternative group, October Project. As a solo artist, her musical inspirations have expanded to include classical, medieval and world music. Her expressive, transcendent voice has been called “a voice for the gods” (Boston Globe), “a powerful, beautifully proportioned contralto” (Variety), “soul-permeating” (Portland Press), and “supernatural” (author Anne Rice). Her music appeals to a wide range of musical enthusiasts, including a large, loyal fan base of Mary Fahl evangelists.

About Dan Reed
Singer-songwriter from Portland, Oregan incorporating simple acoustic songs with world sounds and samples. He's written many electronic tracks, some with his own vocals or some with sampled vocals from different political speakers. With songs composed from Hong Kong to New Dehli, Jerusalem to London, Dan's music has a global sound.

About Adrien Reju
Woodstock-based singer-songwriter Adrien Reju has coined her own brand of indie-folk-­retro-rock with a mesmerizing live performance that draws in audiences with her strong, clear Patsy Cline-esque voice and old-soul quality songs with contemporary hooks. Fellow peer and singer-songwriter Rachael Yamagata says "she is like a bird from another planet who can see directly into your heart". To date, Adrien has released a 5-song EP, Lucky Ones (2012), and a full length LP, A Million Hearts (2009) to critical acclaim and regular rotation on such AAA radio programs as WXPN's World Cafe with David Dye. She has toured the U.S. and Canada appearing as an opener and band member/backup singer with artists including Rachael Yamagata, A.C. Newman (The New Pornographers), Neko Case, Amos Lee, Gillian Welch, Linda Rondstadt and David Bromberg. Her songs "Heartless" and “The Waiting Room” were featured in the Hallmark movie Flower Girl.

About Doug Wimbish of Living Colour
Doug Wimbish of Living Colour will be serving as musical director for the evening. Doug is a legendary musician and bass player - having been with Living Colour for over 20 years. Not only that, Doug is famous as the guy laying down the grooves to some of raps biggest and earliest hits including White Lines and The Message. Doug has also played with the likes of The Rolling Stones (Bridges To Babylon), Mick Jagger (Primitive Cool, Wandering Spirit), Madonna (Erotica), Annie Lennox (Diva, Medusa), Joe Satriani (The Extremist, Time Machine), Jeff Beck (Flash), Seal (Seal), and Billy Idol to name but a few.

About Paul Pesco
Paul Pesco is a legendary guitarist, producer and composer. Paul has served as musical director and lead guitarist for Hall & Oates, and also for Daryl Hall's Live From Daryl's House TV program. He's also played guitar on tour or record with Madonna, Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey, Cyndi Lauper, Steve Winwood, Mary J Blige, Celine Dion, Al Green, Donna Summer, Eddie Murphy, Atlantic Starr, Jennifer Lopez, Alicia Keys, Kitaro, C&C Music Factory and dozens more! Such a thrill to have this amazing talent joining us for a great night of music to raise epilepsy awareness!

About Grant C Weston
Philadelphia's own Grant Calvin Weston became interested in drums at the age of 6, when he discovered his talent for rhythm as he beat on every car on the block. He lived in North Philadelphia where he saw musicians like Stevie Wonder, The Jackson Five and James Brown at the Uptown Theatre. Seeing his attention focused on the drummers, his Father bought him a small set. In high school Calvin learned to read music and played second snare in the drum ensemble. He co-founded the group Bad Influence which played in cabarets and clubs around Philadelphia. At age 17, Calvin joined Ornette Coleman’s Prime Time Band, with bass player Jamalaadean Tacuma, a close friend from philly and Charlee Ellerbe, which toured extensively in North America and Europe. After recording four albums with Prime Time, Calvin went on to play and record with guitarist James "Blood" Ulmer, until he joined John Luries Lounge Lizards in 1990. During the late 90s Calvin recorded and toured with Billy Martin of Medeski Martin and Wood, Tricky, Eyvind Kang, Derek Baily, Mark Ribot, and James Carter. He also played on several movie soundtracks including "Get Shorty".

About David Dzubinski
While a young piano student at Philadelphia's well-known Settlement Music School, David Dzubinski was chosen to perform for the composer Vincent Persichetti. Persichetti called David's performance "spirited and warm" and that description still has resonance today. After attending Temple University for jazz composition and arranging, David pursued advanced studies privately with internationally known and vastly divergent jazz pianists Joanne Brackeen, Dave Burrell and Edsel Gomez. David has performed for/with interactive dance and movement, he has directed group improvisations employing the use of crowd movements and interactions in public spaces, and he has used video and paintings as fodder for writing ensemble pieces and improvisational frame works. As well David has composed and performed music for radio shows, the theatre, and fashion shows. Some of David’s accomplishments include a jazz CD (‘Recyclical’), a Jazz Suite ('Strange Loop') with improvised interactive video commissioned by Philadelphia University, a Music Suite ('Paint') for live painting performance with the fine art painter Nathan Distefano that was commisioned by and performed for Doylestown Health and Wellness Center, performances on three of jazz vocalist/composer Kayle Brecher's CDs ('Spy Music', 'Urban Objects' and 'Apirals and Lines), a score for the Society Hill Playhouse production of Sam Sheppard's 'Suicide in Bb', and one of Dzubinski's compositions has been published by Freddie Hubbard's Hubtones.

Stay tuned for more All-Stars to be added!!!
   
Joni Mitchell's Website


Joni Mitchell - Both Sides Now


Joni Mitchell - California


Joni Mitchell - Big Yellow Taxi


Joni Mitchell - A Case Of You


Joni Mitchell - Woodstock


Joni Mitchell - Girl Of The Northern Country


Joni Mitchell - Little Green